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Magnificent Frigatebird   (Fregata magnificens)
Category: Birds

 

 

The Magnificent Frigatebird is the largest species of frigatebird and is common in the tropical and sub-tropical waters off America on both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts. They have brownish-black plumage, a deeply forked tail, and long, narrow wings. The males are recognized by their large, bright red neck (gular) sacs that they can inflate to attract a mate. In addition to eating fish plucked from the ocean’s surface while in flight, they are also known to engage in “kleptoparasitism,” a curious adaptation wherein they harass another bird until it regurgitates its catch.

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Magnificent_Frigatebird/id

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnificent_frigatebird

 

Data & Facts

Scientific Classification
Kingdom - Animalia
Phylum - Chordata
Class - Aves
Order - Suliformes
Family - Fregatidae
Genus - Fregata
Species - F. magnificens

 
Did you know?
Interesting Animal Facts

“Bird Brain” should be taken as a compliment.

Calling someone a “bird brain” is an insult, but perhaps it should be reconsidered given how many birds display high intelligence and adaptability. For just a few examples, the kea from New Zealand can solve logical puzzles and work with other birds in order to acquire food, observations of Cormorants used by Chinese fishermen indicate that the birds can count up to seven, and many species of birds use simple tools such as sticks to help them acquire food or other items that catch their fancy! There is also a cockatoo named Snowball who can dance to the beat of Billy Idol’s “Dancing With Myself,” though whether this indicates intelligence or not may be a matter of debate or personal taste.

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