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Lionfish   (Pterois)
Category: Fish

 

 

Despite the potent venom found in their dorsal fins, several species of lionfish are popular in the aquarium trade and their generally peaceful natures and hardiness make them appropriate for intermediate marine hobbyists. While some species of lionfish can grow well over a foot long, requiring very large tanks, there are several smaller species appropriate for small tanks in the 30-50 gallon range. They are carnivores that will devour any fish or invertebrates that fit into their cavernous mouths, so they should be kept with similarly or larger sized peaceful tank-mates. Lionfish like to hide out in caves when not out hunting, usually at dawn and dusk, so provide them with places to escape from view. Some species of lionfish, such as, P. volitans and P. miles, have become invasive species as they move beyond or been transplanted from their native tropical habitats.

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Data & Facts

Scientific Classification
Kingdom - Animalia
Phylum - Chordata
Class - Actinopterygii
Order - Scorpaeniformes
Family - Scorpaenidae
Genus - Pterois

 
Fish - Animal Facts

Did you know?


The Greenland Sleeper Shark, the only living species of sub-Arctic shark, is an apex predator only slightly smaller than the great white shark, with an estimated lifespan of 200 years - one of the longest-living vertebrates on the planet. While the Greenland Shark is a slow swimmer, it will eat just about anything: eels, flounders, other sharks, seals - and those are just animals who live in the water! Polar bear remains and even an entire reindeer body have been found inside these sharks! Fortunately, while there are Inuit legends of Greenland sharks attacking kayaks, there have been no reports of human predation. There have been, however many cases of people eating Greenland sharks! Their meat is highly toxic - it will produce effects in your body similar to being extremely drunk, but a fermented version that has been hung out to dry for several weeks is considered a delicacy in Iceland.